19 August 2019

24th Annual Barnyard Fly-in

by John Alford, RAA Oshawa

Come on out to the RAA Oshawa District Recreational Aircraft Association organized fly-in, on Sunday, 8 September 2019 at Hawkefield, CHF4, N44 00, W 78 39, 620 ASL (private strip) ORONO in the Canada Flight Supplement.

It is a friendly gathering of pilots and enthusiasts, their families and their ultra-lights, amateur-builts, warbirds and certified aircraft from all parts of southern Ontario.

Details

Land on the best 3,300 foot grass strip around.

Hours of Fly-in are 0900-1500 hrs.

Overnight camping on field is available, if required. (Portable toilets, no other facilities.)

Please keep safety as a first priority and comply with Transport Canada regulations.

Keep all circuits to the WEST , avoiding residential areas. Traffic advisory frequency is 123.2. NORDO aircraft to follow standard arrival procedures. Circuit height is 1600 feet ASL. Amphibious planes that have trouble taxiing on long grass, please land long or short and park at the ramp, and please notify our radio operator on contact so other aircraft can be spaced to accommodate the longer taxi. We will expect amphibians to back-taxi on the runway rather than taxi onto the general parking area.

** Note the runway 18 threshold is displaced 300 feet to avoid parked aircraft.

FLY MART buy and sell available on site. Bring your treasures to swap and sell.

Breakfast and lunch served for nominal cost, thanks to the Bowmanville Kinsmen club.

FREE CORN ON THE COB AND PRIZES !!

For further information

Hawkefield Barnyard Fly-in

  • N 44 00 W 78 39 Private Field CHF4 (Canada Flight Supplement as ORONO)
  • 123.2 MHz Advisories
  • Runway 18-36 3300' grass
  • All circuits to the west
  • Runway 18 displaced threshold 300' due to parked aircraft
  • Elevation 620'
  • Circuits 1600' on west side of field
  • If NORDO then follow standard arrival procedures

30 July 2019

An Interview With Phil Hale of Manna Aviation

This interview will appear in the October 2019 edition of COPA Flight magazine

Chris Falconar’s homebuilt aircraft designs are well-known in Canada. His company, Falconar Avia, based in Edmonton, Alberta, supplied many homebuiders with plans, kits and parts over the years, in particular for his wooden aircraft designs.

Falconar passed away on 9 September 2018 and the company was wound-up on 30 June 2019. The rights to his F-series aircraft, Minihawk, 2/3 Mustang and the S14 Miranda aircraft plans were purchased by Manna Aviation of Toronto, New South Wales, Australia and are now back on the market.

I interviewed Manna Aviation’s General Manager, Phil Hale, in July 2019, asked him about his company and his future plans.

1. Perhaps we can start with some background on you. What is your flying and homebuilt aircraft experience?

I initially learnt to fly in 2007 in Australia in the ultralight category (equivalent to light sport in the USA) and then upgraded to a full Private Pilots Licence in 2010. During 2008, I was introduced to a colleague who was building his own aircraft, it was a Jabiru 120 and after researching how this was achievable, I decided to give it a go.

After researching many designs and in particular, recognized easy-to-build kits, I decided to build a Zenith CH601 XLB. I built this aircraft from the kit and it was completed in two years, with the first flight being in June 2008. This aircraft was sold in May 2019.

In 2013, I got the bug to start another build, but this time is was going to be from plans. The mission for this aircraft was to be two seat, low wing, retractable undercarriage, respectable range being at least 700 miles, cruise speed of at least 160 knots and of timber construction. I decided to start an Osprey GP4 aircraft which is still in the build process.

2. When did you start Manna Aviation and what were the aims for the company?

Manna Aviation was started in February 2012 with the aim of providing a service to match available hangar space with aircraft owners looking for spaces. The aim of the business was noble, but the reality of finding and match hangar space was limited and not profitable. So began the change in focus, to finding products and services in the aviation industry, which are not currently represented in the Oceania region, was the mission.

The first product we came across was an oxy-acetylene welding torch for use in welding chrome-moly 4130 steel, for the rag and tube aircraft builds. This product was spun off as a separate business, Cobra Torches Australia. Once the welding torch business was established, Manna Aviation became our focus again.

We initially were looking for any aviation-related products and were able to seal a dealership with Flybox Avionics from Italy. We continued our search for other products and we fortunate to be able to pick up the plans business from Falconar Avia, to supplement the avionics business.

3. Who else is involved in the company?

Manna Aviation is a family owned and financed business, with four employees. We are a lean organization, which gives us the ability to adapted to an ever-changing world in which we operate. We add resources as needed to meet peak demands and provide the highest level of customer service.

4. You have a line of EFIS, Engine Information Systems, instruments and an autopilot system, all aimed at homebuilders. How did you get involved in these product lines?

We initially were looking for avionics products, which supported three fuel tank levels as well as the standard engine monitoring systems of EGT, CHT, etc and most of the common makes do not support three tanks. We were able to find a product made by Flybox Avionics from Italy. After making inquiries with Flybox about the product and finding out they did not have any dealers in Australia, we entered into a contract to represent Flybox Avionics in the Australia and New Zealand regions.

5. Your company is in Toronto, New South Wales, Australia. How did you come to get involved in Chris Falconar's aircraft designs all the way from Canada? Did you know Chris personally?

In 2013, while looking for the next build project, the Falconar F-12A “Cruiser” was one of the aircraft I was considering. I was specifically looking for a wooden design and the Falconar designs are a simple to build design with a proven heritage. Although I decided to build the Osprey GP4, I continued to monitor other wooden designs, you just don’t know what will come your way. I was unfortunate that I never got the chance to know or work with Chris Falconar, but my experience of working with Kalvin Falconar and Mel Locke in the transition of the business has been a real pleasure.

6. With the winding up of Falconar Avia this year, after Chris Falconar's death in 2018, you bought the rights to eight of his homebuilt aircraft designs, including the Falconar F-9, 10, 11 and 12, Minihawk, SAL P-51D Mustang and the S14 Miranda. What led you to want to market these aircraft classic plans over something newer?

As an aviation enthusiast, I am disappointed at the number of homebuilt aircraft designs that just disappear and are no-longer available. No contact details to follow up, they just disappear. There are many wooden designs that I would love to have on the books, I am trying to find contacts to make these designs available again, but to no avail. So, I like to think, we can preserve the aviation heritage that designs, like those of Chris Falconar and other designers provided, that started the homebuilt industry, like the Taylor Monoplane, Chilton, Jodel D-9, etc.

7. Is there still a market for plans-built wooden aircraft here in the 21st century?

There will always be a market for plans built wooden aircraft because there will always be the purest who wants to build from plans. Wooden aircraft have a proven heritage going all the way back to the Tiger Moths, and they are still flying. Wood is a wonderful building material and with the modern epoxy-based glues, the ability to build a wooden performance aircraft from timber is easily achievable today. With plantation timbers being available and suitable for building aircraft, the future looks good.

8. Will you be adding partial or complete kits for the aircraft over time?

With the purchase of the rights to the Falconar family of aircraft, came the full kit parts listings and over time Manna Aviation will begin to add kits for each of the aircraft to the range of products available. As Manna Aviation builds the business over time, we are expecting that all the kits previously offered by Falconar Avia will be made available. We will also look into partnering with other businesses in producing the kits.

9. It looks like you are selling the aircraft plans on paper, like Falconar did. Some, like the Mustang plans, are pretty big and heavy and must be costly to ship. Are you considering selling digital copies or are they less useful?

Manna Aviation will be offering the paper-based plans for the near future, while we digitize the plans sets. We have been looking into the shipping costs and this has been kept to a minimum where possible. With today's’ capabilities in digital file technology, Manna Aviation will move to a full digital file delivery of the plan sets. For those clients who prefer to have the paper based plans, we will produce the plans and ship them.

10. What does the future hold for Manna Aviation? Will you be adding more aircraft from other designers or a bigger range of building supplies?

The future for Manna Aviation is bright, with the intention to grow both the plans and avionics business. We will always be on the lookout for new products to add to our range and this will encompass any product that is aviation-related. Manna Aviation will also be working with the team from Hipec Systems [of aircraft fabric coverings] to supply and recommend their products for use in the construction of the Falconar range of aircraft.

Manna Aviation hopes to provide builder-assist programs in the future and the development of a builders’ blog for the Falconar range of aircraft. In relation to adding additional plans from other designers, this is a major part of the business plan. We are dedicated to maintaining the wooden heritage and, where possible, re-establish the market of lost plans like the Jurca range.

11. Is there anything else you want to add?

The Manna Aviation website will be wholly devoted to the aircraft plans business and the avionics and parts business will be moved to a sister company Cobra Aviation.

External links

27 June 2019

RAA Midland-Huronia Northern Regional Fly-In (NRFI) - Planes, Trains & Automobiles

By Rob Macdonald
RAA Midland-Huronia
CYEE RAA

The Midland-Huronia Northern Regional Fly-In (NRFI) — Planes, Trains & Automobiles will take place on 13 July 2019 at the Midland-Huronia Airport (CYEE).

This year we will not have a Transport Canada Safety Seminar. Instead, we present Air Canada Captain (Ret.) Bob Pearson as special guest speaker, who will present The History of the "Gimli Glider". Join us at NRFI to welcome Bob Pearson!

Posters with event details are attached.

As usual the fly-in has free admission.

A small fee applies to attend guest speaker presentation, Bob Pearson. Please contact Midland-Huronia Airport to reserve tickets: by email or by phone 705-526-8086.

Update: STOL Challenge Event Added

A STOL Challenge will be part of NRFI at CYEE on 13 July 2019. STOL Challenge contact is Michael Heintz 705-526-8086.

24 June 2019

Lachute Fly-in 2019

by Mathieu Gratton
2019 APPAL Fly-In Coordinator

APPAL, the Association of owners and pilots of the Lachute Airport invites you to our Fly-in that will take place this year on 03 August 2019.

Giving Back to the Community

This year, the profits from the event will be donated to “La maison de la famille, au cœur des générations d’Argenteuil”; an organization that has for mission “to welcome families and accompany them in all facets of the most beautiful profession in the world; that of being a parent”.

100 Years of Aviation!

In 2019, we are celebrating the 100th anniversary of the first landing in Lachute, that of a Curtiss Jenny in 1919. In addition to the Fly-in, we are joining efforts with the celebration "Our Communities, Our Heritage" which will be on site at the flea market. There will be festivities all weekend, from Friday to Sunday. Come for the Fly-in, Stay for the Bluegrass! Together, we can make this an event to remember!

Aviators' Flea Market

Once again, we will host the Aviator’s Flea Market. If you have goodies to sell, let me know by email at RVA-LACHUTE@VIDEOTRON.CA. We will have a table for you.

Also, if you have a particular aircraft that you would like to exhibit, please notify me. We will reserve you a good spot ... especially if it’s a pre-war treasure.

Looking forward to seeing you in Lachute on 03 August.

17 May 2019

Champlain Flying Club Annual Fly-In Breakfast

  • What: Champlain Flying Club Annual Fly-In Breakfast With Wheels Of The Valley On Display
  • How: Fly-In, Drive-In, Walk-In!
  • Date: Sunday 09 June 2019
  • Time: 0700-1100
  • Where: Bruce Mcphail Memorial Airfield, Cobden Ontario
  • Event: Come join us For breakfast, plus a local band will be playing downhome music
  • Price: Adults: $10.00, children under 10 years old: $5.00

10 May 2019

Rideau Lakes (Westport) Fly-in 2019 - Cancelled

By Mike Miles

I'd like to invite you and all of your fliers to our Spring Fling Fly-in happening on Saturday, May 18 from 8:00 - 13:00. As usual, the flying will be at the Westport airfield (Co-ordinates (N) 43 39 93 (W) 76 23 92) or about a kilometer south of Westport off Highway 10.

As you know, we have one of the nicest grass strips in the region and a great water landing area (we come and get you off the water for transport to the field). Breakfast starts around 8:30 and is available until around noon (donations appreciated) but the field is open as long as people want to stay and catch up.

A great way to start the long weekend, weather willing - see you in Westport!!!

Update - Fly-in cancelled

The fly in is cancelled. The field will be NOTAM closed due to standing water on the field.

190119 CYGK WESTPORT/RIDEAU LAKES
CRL2 RWY 07/25 CLSD DUE SOFT SURFACE
1905172020 TIL APRX 1905311600

31 January 2019

New AULA Flying Boat Amphibian

Press release from Patrick Gilligan

In January 2019, AeroVolga aircraft, the manufacturer of the Borey Amphibious Aircraft, received Transport Canada’s letter of acceptance for the Borey model A, as an Advanced Ultra-Light Aeroplane (AULA).

This is the first amphibious flying boat AULA accpeted in Canada in 2019 and will certainly provide an advantage to flight schools. Students will be able to acquire their Ultra-Light Pilot Permit on land and get checked out as a seaplane pilot, too.

AeroVolga’s team of engineers worked long and hard to optimize weight and simplicity while maximizing strength and serviceability for the Canadian AULA market.

AeroVolga Scientific Production Association (SPA) is a Russian Limited Liability Company founded in 2002. The first aircraft manufactured, the LA-8 twin engine eight-seat amphibious aircraft, made its inaugural flight in 2004. The company received the Quality System Certificate ISO 9001: 2008 (GOST ISO 9001-2011) for the design, production, operation of aircraft, helicopters and other aircraft.

The Aero Volga’s complex has a total area of 550,000 m2, including – “an aerodrome with two runways (concrete and grass)”, industrial, manufacturing facility and auxiliary buildings of 2,500 m2. Currently with a staff of approximately 100 skilled professionals throughout several divisions: design office, production work-shops, maintenance and continuing airworthiness. The company works in close international cooperation with foreign partners, in particular with the Swiss company, Aéronautique Design & Service Bureau.

The Borey

Leveraging Aero Volga’s extensive experience and manufacturing capability, the design of a two-seat amphibious aircraft was initiated and in 2016 the Borey’s first flight was celebrated. Sales efforts took place in 2017 and the first deliveries to customers in Summer 2018. To date a total of eight aircraft have been manufactured, with five delivered to customers, including three for Germany. The first Borey to be delivered to Canada will be in early spring of 2019.

In October 2016, representatives of AeroVolga met with Transport Canada in Ottawa to discuss the AULA -TP10141 design standards and the requirements to qualify as an eligible Advanced Ultra-Light Aeroplane.

Borey’s achievement

In summer of 2018, three AeroVolga aircraft, one Borey two seater accompanied by two LA-8s, performed a flight around the world along the Arctic Circle, over the territories of nine countries: Russia, USA, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. The trip took 43 days, the aircraft flew more than 20,000 km over land, seas and oceans without failure or incident.

01 January 2019

The Canadian Private Fleet Growth Drops in 2018

by Adam Hunt

Growth declined in the Canadian private civil aircraft fleet in 2018, after increasing slightly in 2017. In 2018 the private fleet grew by 82 aircraft, which is 0.28%, while the overall civil aircraft fleet grew by 129 aircraft or 0.35%.

The 2018 numbers are a drop from the 0.35% growth seen in 2017 and far off the peak growth of 2008, just before the recession hit, when the private fleet grew at a peak rate of 3.2%. As the accompanying graph shows, growth rates in the private fleet have been in general decline since the 2008-10 recession started. The numbers seem to not reflect the recovery seen in the overall Canadian economy. The low Canadian dollar, compared to the US dollar, has probably also been a factor and its effect can be seen in the net number of certified single and twin-engined aircraft exported.

The US economy continued to do well in 2018 and its dollar remained fairly high against the Canadian dollar. The Canadian dollar ended the year at 73 cents US, down seven cents since the end of last year. Once again the low dollar resulted in a net flow of used certified aircraft out of Canada, mostly to US buyers.

In 2018 the total Canadian civil fleet increased in size by 129 aircraft. In 2018 the private segment of the fleet increased by 82 aircraft, while the commercial aircraft fleet increased by 60 aircraft and the state fleet, those aircraft owned by the various levels of government in Canada, decreased by 13 aircraft.

Certified Aircraft

Certified aircraft had been leading the growth in private aircraft for a number of years when the Canadian dollar was high, but that trend changed in 2015 when we lost 103 certified aircraft and accelerated in 2016 with the falling Canadian dollar, as we lost 161 certified aircraft. In 2017 we lost 69 certified aircraft and, as the dollar fell in 2018, that increased to 117.

In 2018 the changes to the private certified fleet were made up of a reduction of 117 airplanes, while helicopters increased by seven and gliders increased by one. Private certified balloons were down by eight. The 2018 decline included 71 single-engined aircraft, 37 twins and one three-engined aircraft.

There were 15,946 private certified aircraft at the end of 2018, out of a total of 29,453 private aircraft registered or 54% of the private fleet.

Basic Ultralights

BULAs were once again where the growth was in private aviation in Canada in 2018, as the case has been for several years. During the year the category increased by 118 aircraft, an increase from the growth of 101 in 2015, 104 in 2016 and 98 in 2017. There were 6,336 BULAs registered at the end of 2018.

The attraction of this category undoubtedly remains its low cost.

Amateur-builts

Amateur-builts were in the number two growth position again in 2018, increasing by 37 aircraft, up from 35 aircraft in 2017, although down from a high of 67 in 2014. Interest in this category seems to be slowly trending downwards over time. In 2018 the aircraft added were made up of 39 airplanes and one amateur-built balloon, minus the loss of two gliders and one gyroplane. Airships and helicopters saw no new net additions this past year.

Amateur-builts now number 4,280 in Canada and include a wide variety of aircraft, from fixed wing airplanes, helicopters, gliders, gyroplanes to balloons, airships and even one ornithopter, although the latter is in a museum.

Owner-maintained

The O-M category added 17 aircraft in 2018, the same number as in 2017, which is down from the 42 added in 2015 and 34 in 2016. This makes it the category with the third best growth for 2018, behind basic ultralights and amateur-builts. There were actually 18 airplanes added and one glider removed, for a total 17. By the end of 2018, there were 741 O-M aircraft on the registry, made up of 724 airplanes and 17 gliders.

It is worth noting that aircraft are not built in this category, but are mostly existing Canadian certified aircraft that are moved to O-M. Some may be certified aircraft imported from other countries into the O-M category, as well.

The O-M category has continued to suffer from low numbers of aircraft being moved from the certified category ever since the American FAA announced that O-M aircraft will never be allowed to fly in US airspace or sold in the USA.

Advanced Ultralights

Advanced ultralights were in fourth place for growth again in 2018, increasing their numbers by 13 airplanes, well down from the 20 added in 2015. Their growth this year brought the total number of AULAs on the civil register to 1,254. By its category definition, AULAs are all powered, fixed wing aircraft.

The AULA category was introduced in 1991 and therefore 2018 was its 27th year in existence. The category has increased its numbers at an average of 46 aircraft per year since its inception and so can hardly be considered the success that was anticipated when it was started. As in recent years, the number of AULAs added in 2018 was well below the average from the category's earlier years. The low sales figures are mostly likely linked to the high price of new AULAs and their American counter-parts, Light-Sport Aircraft. US LSAs are also seeing very anemic sales numbers, far below the initial expectations in the US.

Commercial Fleet

In 2018 the commercial aircraft fleet increased by 60 aircraft to bring it up to 7,012. The numbers show an increase of 40 airplanes and 21 helicopters, with the addition of one commercial glider, the sole one registered. Two commercial balloons were removed from the register.

In round numbers, at the end of 2018 the private fleet made up 80% of the aircraft in Canada, with the commercial fleet at 19% and the state fleet at 1%, all basically unchanged in recent years.

Imports & Exports

Aircraft imports into Canada in 2018 numbered 552, which was up from 527 in 2017, but well below the 968 imported during the pre-recession days of 2008.

In 2018, 790 aircraft were exported, well up from the 675 aircraft exported last year. There were 238 more aircraft exported than imported, a net loss that was much higher than the 148 in 2017.

Conclusions

With the continuing loss of certified private aircraft exported mainly to the US, the private civil aircraft fleet saw near-zero growth in 2018. This was a continuation of the trend seen over the last four years and has been occurring despite the national economy doing well in this period. The growth that has been seen in the private fleet has been in the lowest-cost end of the fleet, while many higher-value certified aircraft are being exported. Factors such as increasing aircraft ownership costs, including high avgas prices; Transport Canada's over-regulation of personal aviation; airport closures, increasing lack of public support for burning fossil fuel for recreational activities; low interest in aviation careers by young people, due to low wages and increasing automation, despite a growing commercial pilot shortage; and an aging private pilot population, are all contributing to the lack of growth in the field.

Note: Aircraft data for this report was taken from the Transport Canada Civil Aircraft Register and reflects the difference between the number of aircraft registered in Canada on 31 December 2017 and 31 December 2018. These statistics reflect the net number of aircraft built and imported, minus the number destroyed, scrapped and exported. Just because an aircraft is registered in Canada does not mean it is being flown and therefore the number of registered aircraft should not be confused with the amount of flying activity.

24 September 2018

Pigs and Pies in Westport - Cancelled!!

by Mike Miles, Rideau Lakes Flying Club/COPA Flight 56

Planes from all over Ontario and Quebec generally fly in for the day if the weather is good. Last year we had 50+ different kinds of planes to see. The variety of planes is generally diverse, so a great opportunity to fly your own plane in and to talk with pilots of other makes and models. We have a fabulous spread of Octoberfest sausages (the Pigs) and locally baked pies (the Pies) available for a simple donation.

Love to see you and your members back at Westport on Saturday October 06, either as single plane but preferably as groups of planes from your own Club. For more information you can contact me at 613-276-6276 or Bill Green at (613) 273-5282.

Details

  • Date: Saturday 06 October 2018
  • Time: 11:00–14:00
  • Where: Westport Aerodrome (1 km up Highway 10 - the Old Perth Road) near Westport

23 June 2018

RFC Canada Day Fly-In

From Rockcliffe Flying Club

Every year, the RFC hosts Canada Day celebrations for those who drive-in, walk-in, bike-in, fly-in... even sail-in. Get ahead of this exciting day on Canada's 151st birthday by starting with a hearty breakfast (7-11am), visiting our open house pilot booths (in the morning), enjoying a sightseeing ride (museum side)... and much more besides. Pilots flying in with their aircraft get discounted avgas and the breakfast is on us!

External links

25 May 2018

Bancroft Flying Club Fly In Golf Tournament

By Gary Gaudreau, Director/Secretary
Bancroft Flying Club
Bancroft Community Airport (CNW3)
COPA Flight 119

We are really excited about our collaboration with our next door neighbours, the Bancroft Ridge Golf Club and are pleased to announce that we are putting on our 1st Annual Fly In Golf Tournament on Saturday, 4 August 2018.

Participants can register themselves and their guests on our website.

There are no landing fees, lots of free parking and we have 100LL and JetA-1 available. We hope to see a lot of you here.

22 March 2018

CYOW noise NOIse NOISE!!!

mls-0572yow images

I attended Ottawa Macdonald Cartier International Airport Noise Management Committee meeting on 21 March 2018. It was one of the best noise management meetings I have attended. Neighbours of the airport were represented by 5 local folks. Also at the meeting was representation from Ottawa Flying Club and Ottawa Aviation Services. Others attendees represented the Airport Authority, Nav Canada, Transport Canada, the city of Ottawa and the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association.

The flight training folks that operate light aircraft generate most noise complaints at Ottawa. More on this issue in a moment. There are relatively few noise complaints about jet or turboprop airliners. In fact, complaints about airliners mostly happens during unusual operations, like when a runway is closed for maintenance. One example was the spike in complaints from the Aylmer area of Quebec when due to runway maintenance more airliners landed on runway 14. That put them lower over Aylmer than normally happens. They were seen and heard.

As noted above, the bulk of noise complaints were due to light aircraft in the circuit for either runway 22 or 04. The community representatives asked questions and gave their observations on the traffic they found most distressing. They were very concerned with noise level and frequency of noise events. The representatives from the Ottawa Flying Club and Ottawa Aviation Services said they would do their best to mitigate the noise. They offered to look a flight paths and altitudes in the circuits. There was some suggestion that some circuit aircraft were flying too low, but the airport and Transport Canada said there was little proof of frequent low flying. Both flight training organizations noted that they chastise low flyers and impose corrective measures on the pilots, even cancelling their flying privileges when necessary. They also noted that they would consider quieter mufflers, if they were available and certified in Canada.

One of the airport’s neighbours asked if the flight training could be stopped or at least less frequent, particularly on weekends. The two flight training operations noted that they would go out of business if they could not service their customers/members on the weekends. One of the complainers suggested that the flight training operations were putting their business needs above those impacted by the noise. Both flight training operations offered to do all they could to mitigate the noise. I thought they were most respectful in not pointing out that their families’ well being depended on doing perfectly legal activity of flight training in a manner consistent with all aviation regulations.

Both flight training operations offered to take the locals for familiarization flights so they could see what pilots see. Hopefully that will happen.

The airport noted that they investigate noise complaints but found it very difficult to resolve them without specific information on the time and location of the events. Transport Canada noted that they were conducting investigations of 3 infractions, but that there really was not a problem of frequent low flying at Ottawa airport. They also noted that circuits at Ottawa are a hundred feet or so higher than is the standard 1000 feet above an airport’s elevation across the country.

It was agreed that meetings with community representatives would occur more regularly.

Finally it was noted that runway 04-22 will experience short term closures in the near future. Pilots are reminded to check NOTAMS.

Michael Shaw, former Captain of COPA Flight 8 Ottawa, airmail@rogers.com

10 February 2018

BCATP presentation

Robert Kostecka will be giving a presentation on the Bristish Commonwealth Air Training Program (BCATP) at the Rockcliffe Flying Club (RFC) on 15 February 2018 at 1900 hrs.

Complete details are on the poster at left.

To reserve a spot please contact RFC Dispatch or (613) 746-4425. Space is limited - so you will need to contact them soon to guarantee a spot.

Full-Scale Cessna Simulator Study: 2018

by Kathleen Van Benthem, PhD. ACE Lab Carleton University

We have been busy here at the ACE Lab and are about to embark on a new Cessna 172 study. We have added a new feature where pilots will fly with ForeFlight on an iPad for part of the flight. As well, we will be adding a virtual reality-based cognitive health assessment tool that we designed. We are very excited about this study, as it is a big step forward in our plans.

The ACE Lab at Carleton University is looking for participants!

You may participate if you:

  • are 18 years or older, and
  • have a current permit* or licence (aeroplane), and
  • have a current medical certification; and
  • have flown as pilot-in-command within the last 24-months
    • *students who have solo and cross-country experience may qualify

The study takes place over two sessions at the ACE Lab at Carleton University.

Previous participants are welcome.

Contact cessnastudy@gmail.com for more information or to register.

We look forward to hearing from you!

01 January 2018

The Canadian Private Fleet Rebounds (Slightly) in 2017

by Adam Hunt

Some growth returned to the Canadian private civil aircraft fleet in 2017, after a flat year in 2016. In 2017 the private fleet grew by 101 aircraft, which is 0.35%, while the overall civil aircraft fleet grew by 135 aircraft or 0.37%.

This is the best growth rate we have seen since 2014, but far off the peak growth pace in 2008, just before the recession hit, when the private fleet grew at a peak rate of 3.2%. As the accompanying graph shows, this is the first sign of a reversal from the drop in growth seen due to the 2008-10 recession. In all cases the numbers seem to reflect a cautiously growing Canadian economy, but the low dollar has also had some effects, as can be seen in the number of certified aircraft exported.

The US economy continued to do well in 2017 and its dollar remained fairly high against the Canadian dollar. With the Canadian dollar ending the year at 80 cents US, this resulted in a net flow of used certified aircraft out of Canada, mostly to US buyers.

In 2017 the total Canadian civil fleet increased in size by 135 aircraft. The private segment of the fleet increased by 101 aircraft in 2017, while the commercial aircraft fleet increased by 32 aircraft and the state fleet, those aircraft owned by the various levels of government in Canada, grew by two aircraft.

Certified Aircraft

Certified aircraft had been leading the growth in private aircraft for a number of years when the Canadian dollar was high, but that trend changed in 2015 when we lost 103 certified aircraft and accelerated in 2016 with the falling Canadian dollar, as we lost 161 certified aircraft. In 2017 we lost 69 certified aircraft.

In 2017 the changes to the private certified fleet were made up of a reduction of 80 airplanes, while helicopters increased by seven and gliders increased by three. Private certified balloons were up by one.

There were 16,063 private certified aircraft at the end of 2017, out of a total of 29,371 private aircraft registered or 55%.

Basic Ultralights

BULAs were once again where the growth was in private aviation in 2017, as the case has been for several years. During the year the category increased by 98 aircraft, only down slightly from the growth of 101 in 2015 and 104 in 2016. There were 6,218 BULAs registered at the end of 2017.

The attraction of this category is undoubtedly low cost.

Owner-maintained

The O-M category added 17 aircraft in 2017, down from the 42 added in 2015 and 34 in 2016, making it the category with the third best growth for 2017, behind basic ultralights and amateur-builts. The 17 aircraft added were all airplanes, no gliders this year. By the end of 2017, there were 724 O-M aircraft on the registry, made up of 706 airplanes and 18 gliders.

It is worth noting that aircraft are not built in this category, but are mostly existing Canadian certified aircraft that are moved to O-M. Some may be certified aircraft imported from other countries into the O-M category, as well.

The O-M category has continued to suffer from low numbers of aircraft being moved from the certified category ever since the American FAA announced that O-M aircraft will never be allowed to fly in US airspace or sold in the USA.

Amateur-builts

Amateur-builts were in the number two growth position in 2017, increasing by 35 aircraft, up from 28 aircraft in 2016, although down from an increase of 44 in 2015 and 67 in 2014. Interest in this category seems to be slowly trending downwards over time. In 2017 the aircraft added were made up of 37 airplanes, minus the loss of two helicopters and one gyroplane, with the addition of one amateur-built balloon. Airships and gliders saw no new net additions this past year.

Amateur-builts now number 4,243 in Canada and include a wide variety of aircraft, from fixed wing airplanes, helicopters, gliders, gyroplanes to balloons, airships and even one ornithopter, although the latter is in a museum.

Advanced Ultralights

Advanced ultralights were in fourth place for growth again in 2017, increasing their numbers by only six airplanes, well down from the 20 added in 2015. Their growth this year brought the total number of AULAs on the civil register to 1,241. By its category definition, all AULAs are powered, fixed wing aircraft.

The AULA category was introduced in 1991 and therefore 2017 was its 26th year in existence. The category has increased its numbers at an average of 48 aircraft per year since its inception and so can hardly be considered the success that was anticipated when it was started. As in recent years, the number of AULAs added in 2017 was well below the average from the category's earlier years. The low sales figures are mostly likely linked to the high price of new AULAs and their American counter-parts, Light-Sport Aircraft. US LSAs are also seeing very anemic sales numbers, far below the initial expectations in the US.

Commercial Fleet

In 2017 the commercial aircraft fleet increased by 32 aircraft to bring it up to 6,952. The numbers show an increase of 53 airplanes and a loss of 37 helicopters, with an increase of one commercial balloon.

In round numbers, at the end of 2017 the private fleet made up 80% of the aircraft in Canada, with the commercial fleet at 19% and the state fleet at 1%, all basically unchanged in recent years.

Imports & Exports

Aircraft imports into Canada in 2017 numbered 527, which was up from 398 in 2016, but well below the 968 imported during the pre-recession days of 2008.

In 2017, 675 aircraft were exported, down from 786 last year. There were 148 more aircraft exported than imported.

Conclusions

Aside from a continuing loss of certified private aircraft exported mainly to the US, the private civil aircraft fleet saw a slight rebound after years of ever-slowing growth numbers, although most of the growth is in the lowest-cost end of the fleet. Whether this trend will continue over the next few years remains to be seen, as factors such as increasing aircraft ownership costs, lack of support among younger people for burning fossil fuel for recreational activities, low interest in aviation careers due to low wages and automation, and an aging private pilot population limit possible growth in the field.

Note: Aircraft data for this report was taken from the Transport Canada Civil Aircraft Register and reflects the difference between the number of aircraft registered in Canada on 31 December 2016 and 31 December 2017. These statistics reflect the net number of aircraft built and imported, minus the number destroyed, scrapped and exported. Just because an aircraft is registered in Canada does not mean it is being flown and therefore the number of registered aircraft should not be confused with the amount of flying activity.

14 October 2017

NOTAM: CYRO RWY Closure

from the Rockcliffe Flying Club

Due to circumstances beyond our control, CYRO Runway will be closed on Monday Oct 16, 2017 from 1000-1600 local. Due to a major hangar reorganization at the museum, which will require several aircraft to be parked on our runway. We do not foresee any further delays in re-opening the runway.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

05 October 2017

COPA Flight 131 Pilot Flight Safety Seminar

By Steve Farnworth, Flight 131

The Hawkesbury Flying Club / COPA Flight 131 is hosting a pilot flight safety seminar on Thursday 12 October 2017.

This seminar will feature a presentation by Peter Verbree, a Transport Canada Aviation Safety Inspector.

The seminar is open to all pilots and aircraft owners and will provide credit for the bi-annual recurrent training requirement. The seminar will start at 7 PM and is being held at the Royal Canadian Legion, 152 Nelson Street in Hawkesbury, Ontario. Please use the entrance from the parking lot on Emerald Street.

03 October 2017

COPA 54 Fall Spectacular Poker Run - Event Cancelled

Update 13 October 2017

To all,

It does not look like the weather conditions will allow us to fly safely this Saturday, 14 October 2017, for our COPA 54 First Annual Fall Spectacular Poker Run out of Hanover CYHS.

Please be advised that this event has been cancelled for this year.

COPA 54 looks forward to offering this same event next year around the same time.

Please distribute as appropriate.

Thank you
Regards,
Barry Tschirhart
Captain – COPA Flight 54 (CYHS)

20 July 2017

Noise Management Report Macdonald-Cartier Int’l Airport July 2017

By Mike Shaw

Itinerant aircraft movements are up slightly over last year, but noise complaints are up even more. Interestingly, the majority of complaints are about light aircraft movements! Many of them are from repeat callers.

Complaints about airliners change in response to runway closures. When runway 07-25 is closed complaints increase significantly more than if runway 14-32 is closed. This would be expected since the bulk of movements, due to prevailing westerly winds, are toward the west. Aircraft flying the newer Performance Base Navigation (PBN) approach procedures have stimulated zero complaints. This is encouraging for the future as more airliners are so equipped.

The Ottawa Flying Club’s representative, Rod Cross, noted that we all live in the community and we need to respect each other. He noted that the Club is examining the flight paths of training aircraft to see if they can mitigate the negative impacts. The City of Ottawa is very active trying to mitigate unhealthy noise impacts no matter the source. In fact, for new developments in noise sensitive areas notes on titles will be utilized to ensure folks are advised.

There was some discussion of how to deal with training aircraft circuit procedures. For example, it was suggested that raising the altitude of the circuit might stimulate fewer complaints. but there are tradeoffs such as potential conflicts with traffic using runway 07-25. As well longer climbs would mean full power is on longer for each flight, potentially making more noise. Other suggestions were to install newer engines and mufflers on training aircraft, but this would be very expensive and beyond the means of the flight training operators.

The map above shows a radar plot of the “circuit for runway 22”. I don’t know when it was made but it is representative of the path light aircraft fly at Ottawa Int’l airport.